Hey y’all! I have been getting an insane-in-the-membrane amount of questions about LeadPages recently, most of which have led me to believe that a lot of bloggers and business owners have no idea what it is or how to use it. It’s all good, yo. I was the exact same way when I first started using it. Think of this post as your official initiation into understanding LeadPages. You’ll walk away with lots of ideas about what you can do with this kick-butt software, as well as a variety of ways that you can use it to grow your blog or online business. You ready to rock?
Hey y’all! I have been getting an insane-in-the-membrane amount of questions about LeadPages recently, most of which have led me to believe that a lot of bloggers and business owners have no idea what it is or how to use it. It’s all good, yo. I was the exact same way when I first started using it. Think of this post as your official initiation into understanding LeadPages. You’ll walk away with lots of ideas about what you can do with this kick-butt software, as well as a variety of ways that you can use it to grow your blog or online business. You ready to rock? 

The purpose of the transactional landing page is to persuade a visitor to take action by completing a transaction. This is accomplished by providing a form that needs to be filled out. The visitor information is obtained in order to add the visitor’s email address to a mailing list as a prospect. An email campaign can then be developed based on responses to transactional landing pages. The goal is to capture as much information about the visitor as possible. The ultimate goal is to convert the visitor into a customer.[citation needed]
Webflow, a design tool for web developers, packs a lot of information into just a GIF and three form fields. Having the entire sign-up form on a single line is a nice touch here -- not only does it make the page shorter, but filling out each box from left to right shows users how close they are to clicking the fourth blue button and getting started for free.

Webflow, a design tool for web developers, packs a lot of information into just a GIF and three form fields. Having the entire sign-up form on a single line is a nice touch here -- not only does it make the page shorter, but filling out each box from left to right shows users how close they are to clicking the fourth blue button and getting started for free.
LeadPages is *not* the same thing as your email marketing software, such as Mailchimp, ConvertKit, or Infusionsoft. LeadPages helps you get more subscribers, but does not allow you to send regular emails to your list. So, LeadPages can be used to grow your email list and then you can use another service to communicate with that list. Make sense? In that case, why would someone want to use LeadPages? Because they offer tons of templates to help you make high-converting landing pages and allow you to easily send content upgrades.
Testing can be conducted sequentially or in parallel. In sequential testing, often the easiest to implement, the various versions of the webpages are made available online for a specified time period. In parallel (split) testing, both versions are made available, and the traffic is divided between the two. The results of sequential split testing can be skewed by differing time periods and traffic patterns in which the different tests are run.
This is one of my favorite things about LeadPages. For most people, designing a lead magnet landing page on their website is difficult because then you’d have to mess with the coding on your site and could potentially break something. LeadPages makes it mega easy. They have about a zillion different templates you can customize to create landing page opt-in forms, like this one:
LeadPages is *not* the same thing as your email marketing software, such as Mailchimp, ConvertKit, or Infusionsoft. LeadPages helps you get more subscribers, but does not allow you to send regular emails to your list. So, LeadPages can be used to grow your email list and then you can use another service to communicate with that list. Make sense? In that case, why would someone want to use LeadPages? Because they offer tons of templates to help you make high-converting landing pages and allow you to easily send content upgrades.

Of course, the address itself won't be enough to estimate the value of a home. It just denotes the home's neighborhood. That's why the next page follows with more questions about the property itself, like number of beds and baths. Below, you see the copy "Tell us where to send the report" -- with a disclaimer that, by entering this information, you're agreeing to connect with a real estate agent. This is a great example of a company giving value to their visitors from the get-go, while setting visitors' expectations about what will happen as a result.


Landing pages are often linked to social media, e-mail campaigns or search engine marketing campaigns in order to enhance the effectiveness of the advertisements. The general goal of a landing page is to convert site visitors into sales or leads. If the goal is to obtain a lead, the landing page will include some method for the visitor to get into contact with the company, usually a phone number, or an inquiry form. If a sale is required, the landing page will usually have a link for the visitor to click, which will then send them to a shopping cart or a checkout area. By analyzing activity generated by the linked URL, marketers can use click-through rates and conversion rate to determine the success of an advertisement.[3]
Committed: Ideally, you want to close the deal when all red flags have been dealt with. In reality, most deals close while critical red flags still exist. At this point, you have provided the customer with a proposal that outlines key contractual terms. When a customer has agreed to move forward with a deal, they are “committed” (also known as “verbal commitment” or “verbal”). What remains is to work out the details of the contract, delivery and payment, all of which have the potential to“undo” the commitment. The commitment may be offered contingent upon certain terms being met.
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If you do an interview or guest post, you can send people directly to your landing page. It doesn’t help you as much to send people to your blog or website’s homepage. People sent directly to your homepage have too many options, may not find what they’re interested in, and more often than not, will leave. So, if you’re doing a podcast interview or guest post, it would be better to send people to a landing page where they can opt-in. Once you have someone’s email address, you’re able to communicate and build a relationship with them. It’s much different than if they simply visited your blog once, two weeks ago. You catch my drift?
Landing pages originated with the IT departments of Microsoft in late 2003 in response to poor online sales of Office.[5] The process was tedious and time-consuming. As a result, in 2009, several startups, including Unbounce, were formed to simplify and streamline the process. The rise of cloud computing and e-commerce around 2009 provided ideal conditions for these startups to flourish.[5] Since then the customer requirements changed, requesting integrations with other solutions such as email marketing, lead nurturing and customer relationship management systems.
Nauto, a data platform for self-driving cars, helps make autonomous driving safer for companies who manage fleets of self-driving vehicles. Naturally, its customers would need all kinds of information to sell them on this platform. Nauto has it, packaged into a super-simple ebook whose landing page gives you both a brief contact form and some preview statistics to prove why this resource is so important.
If you do an interview or guest post, you can send people directly to your landing page. It doesn’t help you as much to send people to your blog or website’s homepage. People sent directly to your homepage have too many options, may not find what they’re interested in, and more often than not, will leave. So, if you’re doing a podcast interview or guest post, it would be better to send people to a landing page where they can opt-in. Once you have someone’s email address, you’re able to communicate and build a relationship with them. It’s much different than if they simply visited your blog once, two weeks ago. You catch my drift?
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