This is not something I’ve tried, but I have seen others use it successfully. I’m sure you’ve seen this before! Basically, you can have someone text a certain word or phrase to a specific number. They’ll receive a text telling them to respond with their email address and then once they do, they’ll be subscribed! This has a number of really neat uses, like: 

Trulia did something very similar to Bills.com with their landing page. It starts with a simple form asking for "an address" (which sounds less creepy than "your address," although that's what they mean). Below this simple form field is a bright orange button that contrasts well with the hero image behind the form, and emphasizes that the estimate will be personalized to your home.
If you’re using an email service like Mailchimp, then you might be stumped on how to send content upgrades without adding subscribers to a gazillion lists and thereby paying for your subscribers multiple times. LeadPages makes this a very simple fix. To do so, you just need to create a new “LeadPage” or “LeadBox” in LeadPages and then upload your freebie, which will automatically be emailed to your new subscriber after they opt-in. It’s an excellent solution if you want to grow your list with content upgrades, but don’t know how to figure it out tech-wise.
I'm not sure how the algorithm works (or if there's one at all), but while I was filling it out, I had some anxiety about not qualifying. Once I found out I did, I was excited to fill out the form, which I'm sure most people who are in debt and using this tool are. By making this offer seem more exclusive before the form appeared on the landing page, I'd bet that Bills.com increased conversions pretty significantly.

Like many of the other landing pages in this post, Shopify's trial landing page keeps it simple. The user-oriented headline is just a few words, for example, and the page relies on simple bullets, not paragraphs, to communicate the trial's details and benefits. There are only a few fields you need to fill out before you get started. All of this makes it easier for you to get to the point: selling online with their tool.
That small PDF symbol over the feature image helps set expectations for what format the download will be in. The arrow in front of the subheadline helps further direct your attention to important copy they want visitors to read. Like IMPACT, they also have an auto-checked box to subscribe to their newsletter on their form -- which, if turned into an opt-in check box, is a great way to increase subscribers. All of these small, seemingly insignificant details help bring together a solid, admirable landing page design.
This is not something I’ve tried, but I have seen others use it successfully. I’m sure you’ve seen this before! Basically, you can have someone text a certain word or phrase to a specific number. They’ll receive a text telling them to respond with their email address and then once they do, they’ll be subscribed! This has a number of really neat uses, like:
The purpose of the transactional landing page is to persuade a visitor to take action by completing a transaction. This is accomplished by providing a form that needs to be filled out. The visitor information is obtained in order to add the visitor’s email address to a mailing list as a prospect. An email campaign can then be developed based on responses to transactional landing pages. The goal is to capture as much information about the visitor as possible. The ultimate goal is to convert the visitor into a customer.[citation needed]
Believe it or not, this works and everyday I see new subscribers sharing my opt-in form. Imagine if 10 people subscribed and you didn’t have a page like this. Well…then 10 people would have subscribed and that would be the end of that. BUT…if you have a viral sharing page, like the one above, then those 10 people could very well share it with all of their followers, resulting in more and more subscribers to your list. It’s pretty rad, y’all.
This is not something I’ve tried, but I have seen others use it successfully. I’m sure you’ve seen this before! Basically, you can have someone text a certain word or phrase to a specific number. They’ll receive a text telling them to respond with their email address and then once they do, they’ll be subscribed! This has a number of really neat uses, like:
The image above is a glimpse at one of my webinars that I created in LeadPages. I embedded my live webinar presentation into a webinar template in LeadPages and also added a chat box (not pictured) below the webinar so that attendees could communicate and ask questions. Webinar software can be very pricy, but this solution allows you to do them nearly for free by embedding a live Google Hangouts broadcast. LeadPages is a great option for anyone getting started with webinars.

Testing can be conducted sequentially or in parallel. In sequential testing, often the easiest to implement, the various versions of the webpages are made available online for a specified time period. In parallel (split) testing, both versions are made available, and the traffic is divided between the two. The results of sequential split testing can be skewed by differing time periods and traffic patterns in which the different tests are run.
Believe it or not, this works and everyday I see new subscribers sharing my opt-in form. Imagine if 10 people subscribed and you didn’t have a page like this. Well…then 10 people would have subscribed and that would be the end of that. BUT…if you have a viral sharing page, like the one above, then those 10 people could very well share it with all of their followers, resulting in more and more subscribers to your list. It’s pretty rad, y’all.
If you do an interview or guest post, you can send people directly to your landing page. It doesn’t help you as much to send people to your blog or website’s homepage. People sent directly to your homepage have too many options, may not find what they’re interested in, and more often than not, will leave. So, if you’re doing a podcast interview or guest post, it would be better to send people to a landing page where they can opt-in. Once you have someone’s email address, you’re able to communicate and build a relationship with them. It’s much different than if they simply visited your blog once, two weeks ago. You catch my drift?

Significant improvements can be seen through testing different copy text, form layouts, landing page images and background colours. However, not all elements produce the same improvements in conversions, and by looking at the results from different tests, it is possible to identify the elements that consistently tend to produce the greatest increase in conversions.[citation needed]
The messaging on the page reinforces the reason for their click, reducing or removing confusion and therefore increasing conversion rates. This improves overall user experience and reduces the bounce rate (individuals leaving the site without converting or navigating to another portion of the site) for the page. Good message matching can increase conversion by up to 50% in many cases.[13]
The length of a sales funnel is a lot like the length of the script you would use in a traditional sales pitch. If I’m selling boxes of Girl Scout Cookies, I can use a short script: my audience already knows they’re delicious, they support a good cause, and they’re only available for a limited time. If I’m selling the expensive machinery that makes the cookies, on the other hand, I’ll have to spend more time educating the prospect, answering questions, and demonstrating value.
The purpose of the transactional landing page is to persuade a visitor to take action by completing a transaction. This is accomplished by providing a form that needs to be filled out. The visitor information is obtained in order to add the visitor’s email address to a mailing list as a prospect. An email campaign can then be developed based on responses to transactional landing pages. The goal is to capture as much information about the visitor as possible. The ultimate goal is to convert the visitor into a customer.[citation needed]
It's no surprise Unbounce is near the top of this list -- they've actually written the book on creating high-converting landing pages. Although there are lots of amazing things about this landing page, the two that I absolutely love are: 1) The use of a chat window instead of a classic form, and 2) the detailed -- but well packaged -- information below the form.
Closed-ended experimentation. Consumers are exposed to several variations of landing pages, altering elements like headlines, formatting and layout while their behavior is observed in an attempt to remove distractions that will take the lead away from the page, including the primary navigation.[9] At the conclusion of the experiment, an optimal page is selected based on the outcome of the experiment.
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